Installing a fence isn’t as easy as it looks. You have to check its surroundings to know if it might affect anything or anyone nearby. It could be the cause of a dispute between you and your neighbours, especially if its construction isn’t favourable to them. Before such disputes escalate and damage your relationship, you should talk to them right away and know the legalities of installing a fence:

The Importance of a Fence Permit

Abstract coloured fenceAmazingfencing.com.au notes that Colorbond fencing and other types of property enclosures could be a threat during severe weather conditions. This is why building additional outdoor structures usually involve a building permit, which depends on the codes, regulation, and zoning of your area.

Filing a permit on your own is possible if you know the requirements you need to submit. These include the specific size and measurement of the fence and its computer-aided design (CAD) or professionally stamped drawing. If you’re planning to hire a fencing company, these should be part of their pricing.

Building a New Fence

A healthy relationship with your neighbour makes it easier to talk about each other’s concerns. You’ll hear their side and resolve problems before these go out of hand. There’s also a higher chance of settling an agreement for the fence you want to build. As you can talk to them personally, you’ll also be able to persuade them in case they disagree.

Renewing an Existing Fence

The fence between you and your neighbour belongs to both your properties. If you want to replace or do anything that could damage it, you need to consult with them before starting. A written consent is necessary to serve as proof during the construction procedure. This could also include additional agreements, like attaching shade sails, canvas, signs, and latticework.

Before building a fence, it’s important to think of the consequences that might follow. Talk to your neighbours and get their approval, and consult with fencing companies to find out if there are specific legal requirements in your area.

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